RHINO Poetry Forum: Workshop with Matt Kelsey | SUNDAY 09-25-16

kelsey

COME AND SHOW US YOUR NEW WORK!

Evanston Public Library

ROOM 108 – Small Meeting Room

Church & Orrington

map

1:30-4:30

 

Matt Kelsey is the webmaster for RHINO, and teaches at Northwestern’s Center for Talent Development. He has received scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and teaching fellowships from the University of Washington for their writing programs in Rome and Friday Harbor. His writing has appeared in Beloit Poetry JournalBest New PoetsPacifica Literary Review, and elsewhere.

Topic: Difficult Laughter. Humor is complicated and often uncomfortable. It can even seem, at first glance, discordant with the trademark earnestness of contemporary poetics. But we shouldn’t so quickly relegate humor to the ranks of insincerity and deflection. As the late and uniquely insightful Max Ritvo wrote, “Humor isn’t a shield, a repellant, it’s almost a mnemonic device. It makes our sadness rhyme with joy, and that makes it a catchy jingle…I think we seek out humor because we like completeness. Truth, even. Sadness is completed by humor, not diffused or obscured by it.” We’ll use Ritvo’s words (along with Lacey Jane Henson’s and Cody Walker’s) as a lamp while we explore humorous poems by James Tate, Dorothea Lasky, Ashley Capps, and Michael Bazzett. Once we’ve identified the functions of humor in each poem, we’ll determine how we might expand the tonal range of our own writing.

Drop in, have poems critiqued, and participate in an ongoing discussion of poetry and poetics. Sessions are free* and no registration is required.

Bring 15 or more copies (2 page limit) of a poem you want critiqued.

This project is partially supported by grants from: Poets & Writers, the Illinois Arts Council and The MacArthur Fund for Arts and Culture at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

RHINO Poetry Forum: Workshop with Cecilia Pinto | SUNDAY 7-24-16

Cecilia Pinto

COME AND TRY OUT YOUR NEW WORK ON US!

Evanston Public Library

ROOM 108 – Small Meeting Room

Church & Orrington map

1:30-4:30

 

Cecilia Pinto‘s work has appeared in a variety of literary journals over a twenty year period including Quarter After Eight, The Seneca ReviewDiagram and The Mississippi Review. Her chapbook, ‘A Small Woman,’ is available from Dancing Girl Press. She has self-published two delightful children’s books. She is faculty in the writing conservatory at The Chicago High School for the Arts and teaches for the Writer’s Studio at the Graham School at the University of Chicago.

Topic: Creating the World in Words. What characterizes poetry in which some sort of genesis occurs? We’ll look at some examples of poetry that creates the world as the poet wants it to be and the process of discovery which must be a part of this creation. Come prepared to write your own version of the world!

Drop in, have poems critiqued, and participate in an ongoing discussion of poetry and poetics. Sessions are free* and no registration is required.

Bring 15 or more copies (2 page limit) of a poem you want critiqued.

This project is partially supported by grants from: Poets & Writers, the Illinois Arts Council and The MacArthur Fund for Arts and Culture at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

 

 

RESCHEDULED: RHINO Poetry Forum Workshop led by Nate Marshall JUNE 5

This event has been rescheduled from May 29.

Nate Marshall

COME AND TRY OUT YOUR NEW WORK ON US!

Evanston Public Library

ROOM 108 – Small Meeting Room

Church & Orrington map

1:30-4:30

Nate Marshall is the author of Wild Hundreds (University of Pittsburgh) and an editor of The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop (Haymarket Books).  His last rap album, Grown came out in 2015 with his group Daily Lyrical Product. Nate is a member of The Dark Noise Collective. He won a 2015 Ruth Lilly/Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship. He is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Wabash College.
Topic: Finna – A Poetics of Possibility. In this forum we’ll think about mapping our own linguistic and vernacular traditions and how we can utilize our own “slangs” as sites of freedom.

 

Drop in, have poems critiqued, and participate in an ongoing discussion of poetry and poetics. Sessions are free* and no registration is required.

Bring 15 or more copies (2 page limit) of a poem you want critiqued.

This project is partially supported by grants from: Poets & Writers, the Illinois Arts Council and The MacArthur Fund for Arts and Culture at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

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